Walmart will cut store hours starting Sunday to give workers time to restock

| March 15, 2020

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Walmart Inc., the biggest U.S. retailer, will cut its store operating hours starting Sunday to give its workers time to restock shelves as the coronavirus outbreak intensifies. The pandemic is prompting Americans to buy more groceries and other daily necessities, often emptying shelves in anticipation of an extended period of so-called social distancing or self-isolation. The number of confirmed Covid-19 cases globally has risen to almost 152,000, with deaths nearing 5,700. “I don’t think any of us have been through an experience like this,” Dacona Smith, Walmart’s U.S. executive vice president and chief operating officer, said in a statement, adding that the change is to ensure “associates are able to stock the products” that are in demand. Stores and neighborhood markets some operating as long as 24 hours a day will open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., while those with shorter hours will retain their existing schedules, the Bentonville, Ark.-based company said.

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