How Retail Can Retain Convenience

ALICIA DISTEFANO | December 20, 2019

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I don’t know about you, but I love convenience. I love ordering my groceries from Whole Foods while at the office, and have them waiting on my doorstep by the time I arrive home. Recently, I’m loving being able to pick up online purchases in-store. I order shoes on Nordstrom.com, wait a couple of days, and then pick them up, when it works best for me. If any brand or company offers a way to bring more convenience to my life, you can guarantee I’ll be first in line to give it a whirl. In the past few months, one thing I’ve noticed is that several of my favorite stores have gone through a dramatic and noticeable resurgence to become more convenient. A result of next-day delivery efforts led by Amazon.com and Walmart, these retailers are offering all sorts of options to emphasize the in-store convenience factor.

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OTHER ARTICLES

3 Ways Automated Supply Distribution Can Transform Retail

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Article | April 15, 2021

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Article | December 15, 2020

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ARFREYR

ARFREYR wants to bring Augmented Reality, into mCommerce. The best part about ARFREYR is that we strongly believe that crypto is the future and customers can choose to buy products in our store either with Fiat or any supported cryptocurrency.

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