How ecommerce is changing the packaged goods market

JAMES MELTON | July 8, 2019

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Until recent years, store-based retailers could count on steady sales of consumer packaged goods (CPGs frequently replenished consumables like paper towels and laundry detergent used daily by consumers even as online shopping grew into a near-existential threat. Now, more consumers buy these everyday products online from leading CPG manufacturers, established retail chains and web-focused merchants in, making ecommerce the fastest-grow in sales channel for CPGs. Based on analysis from Internet Retailer’s just-released 2019 Online Consumer Packaged Goods Report, CPG manufacturers are building their ecommerce businesses using strategies that include working with online retailers, selectively selling directly to consumers and collectively spending billions of dollars on strategic acquisitions of upstart brands.

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