Global Retail: How is the rest of the world doing?

BEN STEVENS | June 11, 2018

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“This ‘perfect storm’ of factors may even see the industry reach a pivotal point in 2018, with increased levels of defensive consolidation and creative collaboration as well as the inevitable fall out of casualties the likely outcome in the ongoing fight to survive.” The Retail Think Tank’s predictions for UK retail in 2018 have, unfortunately, proven to be rather accurate. This “perfect storm” includes factors affecting the whole world of retail, like the relentless growth of Amazon, an ever-growing shift away from physical stores, and a consumer shift towards doing instead of buying. However, some of the biggest problems facing the industry are uniquely British. The fall in the value of the sterling since the Brexit vote has created a raft of problems for retailers, driving up import costs and forcing retailers to either absorb the costs or drive up prices.

Spotlight

Home Retail Group PLC

One of the UK’s leading home and general merchandise retailers – with sales last year of over £5.7 billion, around 180 million transactions and a workforce of some 30,000 – we’re the driving force of a business that includes two of the best-known names in retail: Argos and Habitat.

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Spotlight

Home Retail Group PLC

One of the UK’s leading home and general merchandise retailers – with sales last year of over £5.7 billion, around 180 million transactions and a workforce of some 30,000 – we’re the driving force of a business that includes two of the best-known names in retail: Argos and Habitat.

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