Facing What Matters at Retail

KALEY ROSHITSH | March 7, 2019

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“Less is more” is a common theme with brick-and-mortar retailers. according to Mark Bunney, director of go-to-market strategy at Ingenico.Speaking to WWD on how retailers can better leverage omnichannel in stride with ever-changing consumer needs, Bunney sees three main areas of contention. First and foremost, retailers need to “understand their customers.” If retailers wish to pave a pleasing experience in their aisles and at the checkout, then they must know exactly who they are and what they need. In the case of Ingenico, servicing retail clients such as Carrefour, the French multinational grocery chain, the benefit is found in a protective omnichannel payment acceptance solution. While in terms of customer engagement, customers may see value in interactive services at the point of sale.

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