Experts share 2019 retail customer experience predictions

JUDY MOTTL | January 1, 2019

article image
As 2018 fades to a close, Retail Customer Experience reached out to industry watchers, customer experience experts and those in the know in the trenches of customer experience technology, advancements and innovation and asked them to share what they expect to come into play in 2019. In a blog post on what's in and out in 2019, the National Retail Federation said it expects the physical retail space to undergo greater transformation with customer experience values such as transparency and sustainability playing a greater role. The industry organization also expects AI, robotics and personalization to take a front-and-center role. Those predictions match up with what Retail Customer Experience readers were most interested in reading about in 2018 – the top 10 topics of interest included store design, automated retail, self-checkout and assisted selling.

Spotlight

7-Eleven

7-Eleven introduced the world to convenience. And in return, the world made us the #1 convenience retailer. It started with a simple idea – give customers what they want, when and where they want it. That was 1927. And what started on a single ice dock in Dallas, Texas, has since grown to more than 55,000 locations in 16 countries around the globe. The idea may have been simple, but it started a retail revolution.

OTHER ARTICLES

How In-Store Brands Are Taking Over In-Store

Article | April 10, 2020

CPG companies have been feeling the pain from store brands for close to a decade now. Increased quality, curated offerings and better graphics have all led shoppers to try and in many cases then switch to the store brand offering. The latest salvo in this war is about data. Supermarkets used to rely heavily on data and insights on everything from shelf placement to how to market and promote foods from the likes of their CPG partners as well as Nielsen and IRI, to name just a couple. Then "category captains" were created. Usually staffed from the leading CPG brand and headquartered at the retailer’s location, those CPG companies offered retailers insights and recommendations on how to sell more product across the entire category—not just their own brand. Those positions are being eliminated. The source and quality of data has changed. Grocers are relying on their own proprietary research to decide how and where and at what price to place products—their own brands as well as those from CPG.

Read More

Can AI give retail a boost?

Article | February 13, 2020

The retail industry has undergone multiple transformations during the past century, with those who adapt and innovate continuing to survive. It also helps if one is exceptionally unique. It seems that the world's consumers have gotten a little tired from having to explore multiple shopping locations to find what they want or need. But the opportunity for companies to display their branding and sway customers to buy more than they need was once considered a ground breaking idea. In the United States (US), before 1916, customers would pass their grocery list to a clerk, who would then put items together for shoppers in one bag. That all changed when Piggly Wiggly opened over 100 years ago – allowing customers to instead browse the store and collect the items by themselves in a basket.

Read More

5 TIPS TO NAIL YOUR VIDEO MARKETING STRATEGY

Article | March 22, 2020

Oftentimes, our social media video marketing efforts are weighed down by our own customers for the lack of thoughtful stories that can touch upon them. These are like run-of-the-mill, telling everything that the target viewers are least interested in knowing. And the heavy budgets we utilize to create a ‘so called’ powerful video is usually downcast as a no-brainer. There does exist a gap between what we do and what is expected of us. Whether it is B2B video marketing or B2C video marketing, the underlying objective of filling the gap remains the same.

Read More

Retail ,Wholesale Trade,Ecommerce,Retail,E-commerce,point of sale.

Article | February 10, 2020

Last July, a small group representing the giants of the tech industry gathered in the seat of US government, Washington DC. They probably didn’t want to be there. Congress had summoned their employers Apple, Facebook, Google, and Amazon to answer questions about the command they hold over the markets they operate in. On Amazon’s behalf, associate general counsel Nate Sutton spoke in defense of his employer’s role in US retail. Throughout, he argued that Amazon isn’t so powerful as to be able to control prices and stifle competition. Amazon, he pointed out, makes up less than 1% of retail globally. In the US, it accounts for around 4% of retail. In fact, Walmart is much larger than Amazon, he said. In terms of sales, Sutton is right. Walmart reported $510 billion in total sales across its US and international segments in the 2019 fiscal year, versus Amazon’s $233 billion in roughly the same period.

Read More

Spotlight

7-Eleven

7-Eleven introduced the world to convenience. And in return, the world made us the #1 convenience retailer. It started with a simple idea – give customers what they want, when and where they want it. That was 1927. And what started on a single ice dock in Dallas, Texas, has since grown to more than 55,000 locations in 16 countries around the globe. The idea may have been simple, but it started a retail revolution.

Events