Everywhere and nowhere: Online retailers lagging behind on contactability

| January 13, 2018

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Online shopping is easy; customers can shop comfortably wherever they want, from the device of their choosing. What is missing is the possibility of speaking with a company representative in store, whether to ask for extra information, request a specific product or resolve a non-standard query. To maintain the ease of shopping online, retailers need to ensure that customers can get in touch quickly in these situations, via their preferred channel. Yet latest research commissioned by Yonder Digital Group shows that online-only retailers still have a way to go when it comes to making themselves available. Online platforms are increasingly the first port of call for shoppers, and the potential for engagement with customers seems limitless. In addition to browsing and buying online, customers can now find many retailers on their preferred social media platform, where they can follow all the latest trends and developments. And it pays to be digitally active: U.K. online retail sales reached £133bn in 2016, an increase of £18bn, or 15.9 percent, year-on-year.

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