Digitization in retail making your omni-channel strategy a reality

| June 20, 2017

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Retailers across Europe face a range of challenges from various vectors: competition from top brands, pure online players’ expansion, pressure for cost optimization, and foremost, growing customer expectations. All these factors force retailers to look for new ways of market expansion. Traditional non-food retailers are under the strongest pressure. They must chase ever-changing consumer needs, combat the challenge from ecommerce vendors, and constantly adjust their offers in all channels in which they operate. The implementation of an omni-channel strategy is, at present, the most effective means of reducing storage and logistics costs, increasing customer spending and loyalty, and outpacing competitors.

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