Despite Defying The 'Retail Apocalypse,' At Home Reportedly Puts Itself Up For Sale

STEVE DENNIS | April 8, 2019

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Amid all the doom and gloom about physical retail, there are quite a few unsung stories of robust growth and solid profitability. At Home Group, the Plano, Texas-based chain of home decor superstores, is one of them. Despite the brand's relative success, reports emerged late last week that because of poor stock performance the company was exploring sale options. Once again, it seems no good deed goes unpunished. While the company has started to experience some headwinds, it is hard to understate what has been accomplished. Under the leadership of CEO Lee Bird, At Home has carved out a well-differentiated and remarkable position in the massive, highly fragmented home furnishings business.

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