China Retail: Can A Personal Shopper Be Your Secret Weapon?

FRANK LAVIN | March 21, 2019

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During a lunch a few weeks ago in Los Angeles, a friend showed up with some products he had just purchased from the local CVS drugstore. When he relayed that the purchases were to be shipped to relatives in China, I observed that his purchases were already available there. He agreed, but said that his in-laws preferred products shipped directly from the U.S. “So you are a one-man daigou,” I commented, and he nodded in agreement. Daigous are one of the most important but least understood sales channels in China, in some cases, so successful that a single daigou e-commerce store can be larger than the “official” branded e-commerce store. Balea, a German skincare brand achieves some one-third of its sales through daigou and indirect channels. What is a daigou and how can a brand use this channel to drive sales?

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Cartera partners with leading companies who offer their customers loyalty programs. We then give their customers a chance to earn even more of the miles, points or cash back they want by shopping with over 900 retailers they already know and love.

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Spotlight

Cartera Commerce, Inc

Cartera partners with leading companies who offer their customers loyalty programs. We then give their customers a chance to earn even more of the miles, points or cash back they want by shopping with over 900 retailers they already know and love.

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