Aussie retailers are fighting the Amazon Armageddon - and winning

ELIZABETH KNIGHT | March 29, 2019

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It's only been a year or so since headlines screamed dire predictions about the Amazon-induced retail Armageddon in Australia. So how is it that our major retailers are holding their ground against the onslaught?Broadly speaking there seems to be two reasons: Price and range. While Amazon has been far less aggressive entering the Australian market than anticipated, local retailers have been mounting a successful rearguard action. An industry report card from Morgan Stanley released on Friday puts the spotlight on two high-profile discretionary retailers, Rebel and JB Hi-Fi, and marks them well for their success weathering the Amazon storm. Comparing prices, the investment bank found Amazon beat JB Hi-Fi on only three of 12 products in its sample, while JB Hi Fi was cheaper than Amazon on five.

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Spotlight

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