7 Tips for Selling Your eCommerce Products Globally in 2019

ASHLEY KIMLER | December 23, 2018

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If you are looking for a way to boost your profit and expand your reach, consider selling your e-commerce products to a global market. Moving from local to global is a big switch that scares a lot of people because they don’t know where to start. The good news is that you can reach a global market without much stress as long as you follow the right steps, and you will be pleased when you see the improvements to your bottom line.Making a plan is vital if you would like to have any hope of reaching your long-term goals. Without a solid plan in place, you won’t make a profit, and your effort could harm your entire business. Attempting to reach a global market without a plan can cause you to waste a lot of time and money on products that don’t sell. You can begin by researching the market of the country to which you would like to expand. Next, decide if you will ship products from your country or outsource to an overseas factory. If you want to move forward with peace of mind, your plan should include the cost of expanding and how much profit you expect to make in the first few months.

Spotlight

Visionworks of America

Visionworks has been a retailer that cares deeply about providing fashionable, quality eyewear and comprehensive eye examinations to every customer that comes to find their perfect vision and perfect frame. Headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, Visionworks is one of the largest retail optical chains in the U.S., operating 733 locations in 40 states and the District of Columbia.

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Spotlight

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