2018 Why brands matter on chinese ecommerce

| March 13, 2018

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China’ s ecommerce industry is already the largest in the world, and is continuing to grow at frenetic speed. In 2017, more than 10 million online stores sold over 1 billion products, with a transaction value of more than 1 trillion USD dollars. The recent Double 11 Shopping Festival recorded 25.3 billion USD dollars on Tmall alone, sales figures 3 times greater than Black Friday in the United States. In China, ecommerce has delivered a devastating blow to traditional brick-and-mortar retailers, and dramatically altered how consumers interact with brands. Never before has a stranger’s experience had such a profound impact on what an individual chooses to buy. Every keyword, click or comment alters how users receive product recommendations, thus influencing their brand choices. This is also the first time that the human desire to buy has been so enabled by technology and data. Every imaginable product and experience is just a click away. Brands are more important than ever in this new era, but a conventional approach is not going to cut it. In this paper, we will explore new ways to make brands matter in ecommerce.

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